Stuart Nakamura, Raven and Pheasant: Reflections on Echo Lake, 2002
© Stuart Nakamura, Raven and Pheasant: Reflections on Echo Lake, 2002, Mixed media, King County Public Art Collection

Nakamura's focus on nature is inspired by the natural qualities and local folklore of nearby Echo Lake, a quiet body of water on the edge of the site. Throughout the transit center repeated images of birds and plants visually retell the Southern Puget Salish myth of "Raven and Pheasant Go Fishing" in metal and painted imagery. The myth, originally told by Salish storyteller Snoqualmie Charlie (b. circa 1850), is recorded on plaques throughout the site.

Stuart Nakamura, Raven and Pheasant: Reflections on Echo Lake, 2002
© Stuart Nakamura, Raven and Pheasant: Reflections on Echo Lake, 2002, Mixed media, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Ned Ahrens

Nakamura's focus on nature is inspired by the natural qualities and local folklore of nearby Echo Lake, a quiet body of water on the edge of the site. Throughout the transit center repeated images of birds and plants visually retell the Southern Puget Salish myth of "Raven and Pheasant Go Fishing" in metal and painted imagery. The myth, originally told by Salish storyteller Snoqualmie Charlie (b. circa 1850), is recorded on plaques throughout the site.

Stuart Nakamura, Raven and Pheasant: Reflections on Echo Lake, 2002
© Stuart Nakamura, Raven and Pheasant: Reflections on Echo Lake, 2002, Mixed media, King County Public Art Collection

Nakamura's focus on nature is inspired by the natural qualities and local folklore of nearby Echo Lake, a quiet body of water on the edge of the site. Throughout the transit center repeated images of birds and plants visually retell the Southern Puget Salish myth of "Raven and Pheasant Go Fishing" in metal and painted imagery. The myth, originally told by Salish storyteller Snoqualmie Charlie (b. circa 1850), is recorded on plaques throughout the site.

Stuart Nakamura, Raven and Pheasant: Reflections on Echo Lake, 2002
© Stuart Nakamura, Raven and Pheasant: Reflections on Echo Lake, 2002, Mixed media, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Ned Ahrens

Nakamura's focus on nature is inspired by the natural qualities and local folklore of nearby Echo Lake, a quiet body of water on the edge of the site. Throughout the transit center repeated images of birds and plants visually retell the Southern Puget Salish myth of "Raven and Pheasant Go Fishing" in metal and painted imagery. The myth, originally told by Salish storyteller Snoqualmie Charlie (b. circa 1850), is recorded on plaques throughout the site.

Stuart Nakamura, Raven and Pheasant: Reflections on Echo Lake, 2002
© Stuart Nakamura, Raven and Pheasant: Reflections on Echo Lake, 2002, Mixed media, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Ned Ahrens

Nakamura's focus on nature is inspired by the natural qualities and local folklore of nearby Echo Lake, a quiet body of water on the edge of the site. Throughout the transit center repeated images of birds and plants visually retell the Southern Puget Salish myth of "Raven and Pheasant Go Fishing" in metal and painted imagery. The myth, originally told by Salish storyteller Snoqualmie Charlie (b. circa 1850), is recorded on plaques throughout the site.

Stuart Nakamura, Raven and Pheasant: Reflections on Echo Lake, 2002
© Stuart Nakamura, Raven and Pheasant: Reflections on Echo Lake, 2002, Mixed media, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Ned Ahrens

Nakamura's focus on nature is inspired by the natural qualities and local folklore of nearby Echo Lake, a quiet body of water on the edge of the site. Throughout the transit center repeated images of birds and plants visually retell the Southern Puget Salish myth of "Raven and Pheasant Go Fishing" in metal and painted imagery. The myth, originally told by Salish storyteller Snoqualmie Charlie (b. circa 1850), is recorded on plaques throughout the site.

Collection: Aurora Village Transit Center Shoreline, Washington

Artist Stuart Nakamura worked with the King County Transit design team to integrate art into the functional features of this transit center.