Periodic Table of Brightwater Artists
© Jim Blashfield, Circulator, 2011, high definition video installation (video still). Photo courtesy of the artist

Artists Jann Rosen-Queralt, Buster Simpson and Ellen Sollod joined the design team as planning artists early on in the design process. The Art Plan for Brightwater was completed in 2003, produced thematic zones for integrated artwork and served as a guide in building the art program.

The intersection of science and art, of industrial processes and the natural world are powerfully manifested in the art program at Brightwater. The artwork at Brightwater plays a key role in helping visitors to understand and to care about the science of the treatment technology and its environmental benefits.

Jim Blashfield, Circulator, 2011
© Jim Blashfield, Circulator, 2011, high definition video installation. Photo by Benjamin Benschneider

"This is a piece that's about water. It's about the ecosystem. It's about our place in it, but it's fed back to us as though in a dream. So this installation is a kind of dream environment that relates to the entire water cycle and Brightwater's place within that."
   -- media artist Jim Blashfield

This seven-screen audio and video installation takes the viewer on a transformative journey through the life cycle of water and the plant's treatment processes, using symbols of home, nature, and watery environments.

Watch Jim Blashfield’s video about the making of Circulator.

Visit the artist's website

Jim Blashfield, Circulator, 2011
© Jim Blashfield, Circulator, 2011, Seven high definition video screens, audio, LCD screens, galvanized and painted steel, glass, Photo by Elizabeth Stewart

"This is a piece that's about water. It's about the ecosystem. It's about our place in it, but it's fed back to us as though in a dream. So this installation is a kind of dream environment that relates to the entire water cycle and Brightwater's place within that."
   -- media artist Jim Blashfield

This seven-screen audio and video installation takes the viewer on a transformative journey through the life cycle of water and the plant's treatment processes, using symbols of home, nature, and watery environments.

Watch Jim Blashfield’s video about the making of Circulator.

Visit the artist's website

Cris Bruch, South Branch, North Fork and Puddles, 2011
© Cris Bruch, Puddles, 2011, Stainless Steel (detail). Photo by Stephen Fandrich

Cris Bruch designed three sculptures for the Center that capture storm water runoff from the roof and channel the water to the ground. Created from standard pipe fittings, South Branch expresses the natural meander of water systems while North Fork reflects manmade systems in a more rectilinear design. Puddles is installed beneath South Branch, conjuring the presence of water even during dry days.

"This was an opportunity to make a passive water feature, one that was only working if the water was running from the sky -- and I also liked the idea of keeping that volume of water right there on the site rather than putting it into some buried line and taking it to the sewer system. My calculation for the volume of water is remarkable. In a 25-year rain, that roof will be shedding 5,000 gallons of water in a 24-hour period. That’s a lot of water."

Listen to Cris Bruch on his ideas for this project.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #9 for this artwork when prompted.

Cris Bruch, South Branch, North Fork and Puddles, 2011
© Cris Bruch, North Fork, 2011, Stainless Steel. Photo by Benjamin Benschneider

Cris Bruch designed three sculptures for the Center that capture storm water runoff from the roof and channel the water to the ground. Created from standard pipe fittings, South Branch expresses the natural meander of water systems while North Fork reflects manmade systems in a more rectilinear design. Puddles is installed beneath South Branch, conjuring the presence of water even during dry days.

"This was an opportunity to make a passive water feature, one that was only working if the water was running from the sky -- and I also liked the idea of keeping that volume of water right there on the site rather than putting it into some buried line and taking it to the sewer system. My calculation for the volume of water is remarkable. In a 25-year rain, that roof will be shedding 5,000 gallons of water in a 24-hour period. That’s a lot of water."

Listen to Cris Bruch on his ideas for this project.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #9 for this artwork when prompted.

Cris Bruch, South Branch, North Fork and Puddles, 2011
© Cris Bruch, North Fork, 2011, Stainless Steel. Photo by Benjamin Benschneider

Cris Bruch designed three sculptures for the Center that capture storm water runoff from the roof and channel the water to the ground. Created from standard pipe fittings, South Branch expresses the natural meander of water systems while North Fork reflects manmade systems in a more rectilinear design. Puddles is installed beneath South Branch, conjuring the presence of water even during dry days.

"This was an opportunity to make a passive water feature, one that was only working if the water was running from the sky -- and I also liked the idea of keeping that volume of water right there on the site rather than putting it into some buried line and taking it to the sewer system. My calculation for the volume of water is remarkable. In a 25-year rain, that roof will be shedding 5,000 gallons of water in a 24-hour period. That’s a lot of water."

Listen to Cris Bruch on his ideas for this project.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #9 for this artwork when prompted.

Ellen Sollod, Collection & Transformation It's All About the Water, 2011
© Ellen Sollod, Collection and Transformation, 2011, Laboratory glass, blown glass, mirrored glass, steel. Photo by Benjamin Benschneider

Two artworks by Ellen Sollod illuminate the processes of the plant and celebrate the role of science in the facility. Collection and Transformation is installed on the exterior of the Center near the Northeast Plaza and contains laboratory glass and hand blown microbial forms in a mirrored, illuminated environment. The hand painted and acid etched glass window, It's All About the Water, bring the science of the laboratory and the treatment plant into the main gathering space of the interior and makes present the watery world of the process train.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Ellen Sollod talk about creating Collection & Transformation for the Center.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #8 & #10 for these artworks when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Ellen Sollod, Collection & Transformation It's All About the Water, 2011
© Ellen Sollod, Collection and Transformation, 2011, Laboratory glass, blown glass, mirrored glass, steel (detail). Photo courtesy of the artist.

Two artworks by Ellen Sollod illuminate the processes of the plant and celebrate the role of science in the facility. Collection and Transformation is installed on the exterior of the Center near the Northeast Plaza and contains laboratory glass and hand blown microbial forms in a mirrored, illuminated environment. The hand painted and acid etched glass window, It's All About the Water, bring the science of the laboratory and the treatment plant into the main gathering space of the interior and makes present the watery world of the process train.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Ellen Sollod talk about creating Collection & Transformation for the Center.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #8 & #10 for these artworks when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Ellen Sollod, Collection & Transformation It's All About the Water, 2011
© Ellen Sollod, It's All About the Water, 2011, vitreous enamel on glass. Photo by Benjamin Benschneider

Two artworks by Ellen Sollod illuminate the processes of the plant and celebrate the role of science in the facility. Collection and Transformation is installed on the exterior of the Center near the Northeast Plaza and contains laboratory glass and hand blown microbial forms in a mirrored, illuminated environment. The hand painted and acid etched glass window, It's All About the Water, bring the science of the laboratory and the treatment plant into the main gathering space of the interior and makes present the watery world of the process train.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Ellen Sollod talk about creating Collection & Transformation for the Center.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #8 & #10 for these artworks when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Claude Zervas, Chandelier, 2011
© Claude Zervas, Chandelier, 2011, electronics, LED lighting, recycled wood. Photo by Ned Ahrens

Chandelier takes its name from classic 18th century decorative motifs. Inside each of the wall-mounted modules, computer controlled LED lighting simulates the kinetic action of rotifer movements and water flow dynamics in an ever-changing display. The wooden frames are made from reclaimed scraps of the recycled fir and paralam beams used throughout the building.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Claude Zervas talk about Chandelier.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #11 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Claude Zervas, Chandelier, 2011
© Claude Zervas, Chandelier, 2011, electronics, LED lighting, recycled wood (detail). Photo by 4Culture

Chandelier takes its name from classic 18th century decorative motifs. Inside each of the wall-mounted modules, computer controlled LED lighting simulates the kinetic action of rotifer movements and water flow dynamics in an ever-changing display. The wooden frames are made from reclaimed scraps of the recycled fir and paralam beams used throughout the building.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Claude Zervas talk about Chandelier.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #11 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Buster Simpson, Bio Boulevard & Water Molecule, 2011
© Buster Simpson, Bio Boulevard & Water Molecule, 2011, painted steel, concrete (detail). Photo courtesy of the artist

The bright red Water Molecule, with its two white oxygen atoms, feeds reclaimed water through a purple "straw" and a 100-foot long purple pipe to a natural filtration system. Within the plant and around the world purple pipe signifies reclaimed water. Here, the pipe is held up by tetrapod forms that the artist envisions as civic workers. Placed at the entrance to the site, Bio Boulevard & Water Molecule celebrates the final product of Brightwater. Buster Simpson, along with Jann Rosen-Queralt and Ellen Sollod, was a planning artist on Brightwater, contributing to the Brightwater Art Plan that served as a guide to all of the artwork in the Treatment System.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Buster Simpson talk about creating his artwork for the Landscape zone.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #5 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Buster Simpson, Bio Boulevard & Water Molecule, 2011
© Buster Simpson, Bio Boulevard & Water Molecule, 2011, painted steel, concrete (detail). Photo by Jon Kamita

The bright red Water Molecule, with its two white oxygen atoms, feeds reclaimed water through a purple "straw" and a 100-foot long purple pipe to a natural filtration system. Within the plant and around the world purple pipe signifies reclaimed water. Here, the pipe is held up by tetrapod forms that the artist envisions as civic workers. Placed at the entrance to the site, Bio Boulevard & Water Molecule celebrates the final product of Brightwater. Buster Simpson, along with Jann Rosen-Queralt and Ellen Sollod, was a planning artist on Brightwater, contributing to the Brightwater Art Plan that served as a guide to all of the artwork in the Treatment System.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Buster Simpson talk about creating his artwork for the Landscape zone.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #5 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Buster Simpson, Bio Boulevard & Water Molecule, 2011
© Buster Simpson, Bio Boulevard & Water Molecule, 2011, painted steel, concrete (detail). Photo by King County, Ned Ahrens

The bright red Water Molecule, with its two white oxygen atoms, feeds reclaimed water through a purple "straw" and a 100-foot long purple pipe to a natural filtration system. Within the plant and around the world purple pipe signifies reclaimed water. Here, the pipe is held up by tetrapod forms that the artist envisions as civic workers. Placed at the entrance to the site, Bio Boulevard & Water Molecule celebrates the final product of Brightwater. Buster Simpson, along with Jann Rosen-Queralt and Ellen Sollod, was a planning artist on Brightwater, contributing to the Brightwater Art Plan that served as a guide to all of the artwork in the Treatment System.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Buster Simpson talk about creating his artwork for the Landscape zone.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #5 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Andrea Wilbur-Sigo, Grandfather's Wisdom, 2011
© Andrea Wilbur-Sigo, Grandfather's Wisdom, 2011, carved and painted cedar, cast stone, King County Public Art Collection

Working in visual traditions that have endured over centuries of craft, Andrea Wilbur-Sigo carved and painted a welcoming Longhouse structure based on the First Peoples of Puget Sound Northwest Coast traditions. A member of the Squaxin Island Tribe, Wilbur-Sigo incorporated symbols meaningful to her people and to tribes throughout the region. The location, by water that flows to Little Bear Creek, honors the First Peoples' reverence for the natural world and the sustaining importance of salmon and the regional waterways in their culture.

Listen to Andrea Wilbur-Sigo talk about creating her artwork for the Landscape zone.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #7 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Andrea Wilbur-Sigo, Grandfather's Wisdom, 2011
© Andrea Wilbur-Sigo, Grandfather's Wisdom, 2011, carved and painted cedar, cast stone, King County Public Art Collection

Working in visual traditions that have endured over centuries of craft, Andrea Wilbur-Sigo carved and painted a welcoming Longhouse structure based on the First Peoples of Puget Sound Northwest Coast traditions. A member of the Squaxin Island Tribe, Wilbur-Sigo incorporated symbols meaningful to her people and to tribes throughout the region. The location, by water that flows to Little Bear Creek, honors the First Peoples' reverence for the natural world and the sustaining importance of salmon and the regional waterways in their culture.

Listen to Andrea Wilbur-Sigo talk about creating her artwork for the Landscape zone.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #7 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Andrea Wilbur-Sigo, Grandfather's Wisdom, 2011
© Andrea Wilbur-Sigo, Grandfather's Wisdom, 2011, carved and painted cedar, cast stone, King County Public Art Collection

Working in visual traditions that have endured over centuries of craft, Andrea Wilbur-Sigo carved and painted a welcoming Longhouse structure based on the First Peoples of Puget Sound Northwest Coast traditions. A member of the Squaxin Island Tribe, Wilbur-Sigo incorporated symbols meaningful to her people and to tribes throughout the region. The location, by water that flows to Little Bear Creek, honors the First Peoples' reverence for the natural world and the sustaining importance of salmon and the regional waterways in their culture.

Listen to Andrea Wilbur-Sigo talk about creating her artwork for the Landscape zone.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #7 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Eduardo Calderón, Photographer in Residence, 2004-2011
© Eduaro Calderón, Tunnel #3, 2008, photograph, King County Public Art Collection

Beginning in 2004, photographer Eduardo Calderón visited the Brightwater site several times a month and photographed what he saw. From auto wrecking yards to the conveyance tunnel, staff portraits to completed structures and installed artworks, the photographs, now in the King County Public Art Collection, tell the story of Brightwater and its place. The photographs are installed throughout the Center and offices at Brightwater.

Listen to Eduardo Calderón talk about his experience as Photographer in Residence for Brightwater.

See a slideshow of some of Eduardo Calderón's photographs from Brightwater.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #12 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Collection: Brightwater Center Woodinville, Washington

"Artists participating in the Brightwater project are challenged to create works that ingeniously expose the working processes of the system and engage the public in inquiry and discovery."