Christian Moeller, VERDI, 2011
© Christian Moeller, VERDI, 2012, stainless steel, glass. Photo by Benjamin Benschneider

VERDI, a 65-foot sculptural tower at the Influent Pump Station in Bothell, ingeniously encloses the pump station's odor control stack with +3500 repurposed green glass water bottles. The tower is a visual statement about our culture's consumption of bottled water, connecting that practice to the process of resource use and water purification within the Brightwater system. The artist is concerned with the politics and power structure of water resources stating that, "a growing market for bottled water has exploded and hundreds of companies find themselves in competition, selling us a product that on deeper thought should be freely accessible to all." Communicating the enormous amount of water that is conveyed to and from Brightwater, Verdi also references the traditional architecture of water towers, structures that have had historical roles of conservation and sustenance as well as landmark functions.

Visit the artist's website.

Learn more about the Brightwater Treatment System.

Christian Moeller, VERDI, 2011
© Christian Moeller, VERDI, 2012, stainless steel, glass (detail). Photo courtesy of the artist

VERDI, a 65-foot sculptural tower at the Influent Pump Station in Bothell, ingeniously encloses the pump station's odor control stack with +3500 repurposed green glass water bottles. The tower is a visual statement about our culture's consumption of bottled water, connecting that practice to the process of resource use and water purification within the Brightwater system. The artist is concerned with the politics and power structure of water resources stating that, "a growing market for bottled water has exploded and hundreds of companies find themselves in competition, selling us a product that on deeper thought should be freely accessible to all." Communicating the enormous amount of water that is conveyed to and from Brightwater, Verdi also references the traditional architecture of water towers, structures that have had historical roles of conservation and sustenance as well as landmark functions.

Visit the artist's website.

Learn more about the Brightwater Treatment System.

Christian Moeller, VERDI, 2011
© Christian Moeller, VERDI, 2012, stainless steel, glass. Photo by Benjamin Benschneider

VERDI, a 65-foot sculptural tower at the Influent Pump Station in Bothell, ingeniously encloses the pump station's odor control stack with +3500 repurposed green glass water bottles. The tower is a visual statement about our culture's consumption of bottled water, connecting that practice to the process of resource use and water purification within the Brightwater system. The artist is concerned with the politics and power structure of water resources stating that, "a growing market for bottled water has exploded and hundreds of companies find themselves in competition, selling us a product that on deeper thought should be freely accessible to all." Communicating the enormous amount of water that is conveyed to and from Brightwater, Verdi also references the traditional architecture of water towers, structures that have had historical roles of conservation and sustenance as well as landmark functions.

Visit the artist's website.

Learn more about the Brightwater Treatment System.

Christian Moeller, VERDI, 2011
© Christian Moeller, VERDI, 2012, stainless steel, glass. Photo by Benjamin Benschneider

VERDI, a 65-foot sculptural tower at the Influent Pump Station in Bothell, ingeniously encloses the pump station's odor control stack with +3500 repurposed green glass water bottles. The tower is a visual statement about our culture's consumption of bottled water, connecting that practice to the process of resource use and water purification within the Brightwater system. The artist is concerned with the politics and power structure of water resources stating that, "a growing market for bottled water has exploded and hundreds of companies find themselves in competition, selling us a product that on deeper thought should be freely accessible to all." Communicating the enormous amount of water that is conveyed to and from Brightwater, Verdi also references the traditional architecture of water towers, structures that have had historical roles of conservation and sustenance as well as landmark functions.

Visit the artist's website.

Learn more about the Brightwater Treatment System.

Christian Moeller, VERDI, 2011
© Christian Moeller, VERDI, 2012, stainless steel, glass. Photo by Benjamin Benschneider

VERDI, a 65-foot sculptural tower at the Influent Pump Station in Bothell, ingeniously encloses the pump station's odor control stack with +3500 repurposed green glass water bottles. The tower is a visual statement about our culture's consumption of bottled water, connecting that practice to the process of resource use and water purification within the Brightwater system. The artist is concerned with the politics and power structure of water resources stating that, "a growing market for bottled water has exploded and hundreds of companies find themselves in competition, selling us a product that on deeper thought should be freely accessible to all." Communicating the enormous amount of water that is conveyed to and from Brightwater, Verdi also references the traditional architecture of water towers, structures that have had historical roles of conservation and sustenance as well as landmark functions.

Visit the artist's website.

Learn more about the Brightwater Treatment System.

Buster Simpson, Conveyance Portal, 2012
© Buster Simpson, Conveyance Portal, 2012, concrete, painted stainless steel, nylon rope, King County Public Art Commission

Conveyance Portal is part of an episodic series of works that begins at the entry to the Brightwater plant in Woodinville. Using purple pipe, the industry standard to convey reclaimed water and concrete tripod forms that the artist imagines as heroic figures, the artworks visually and poetically reference the extent of the Brightwater system, the application of holistic water resources management, and the collective effort embodied in public works infrastructure. The artistic markers will span the conveyance from the marine outfall, to influent pump station, to treatment plant.

Conveyance Portal is visible from the boardwalk that runs through the rain garden furrows, further emphasizing the relationship between our natural cycle and the treatment system. The rain garden landscape provides filtration and infiltration for the site and is the way that the facility manages to clean the rainwater that falls on or near the site.

Visit the artist's website.

Learn more about the Brightwater Treatment System.

Buster Simpson, Conveyance Portal, 2012
© Buster Simpson, Conveyance Portal, 2012, concrete, painted stainless steel, nylon rope, King County Public Art Commission

Conveyance Portal is part of an episodic series of works that begins at the entry to the Brightwater plant in Woodinville. Using purple pipe, the industry standard to convey reclaimed water and concrete tripod forms that the artist imagines as heroic figures, the artworks visually and poetically reference the extent of the Brightwater system, the application of holistic water resources management, and the collective effort embodied in public works infrastructure. The artistic markers will span the conveyance from the marine outfall, to influent pump station, to treatment plant.

Conveyance Portal is visible from the boardwalk that runs through the rain garden furrows, further emphasizing the relationship between our natural cycle and the treatment system. The rain garden landscape provides filtration and infiltration for the site and is the way that the facility manages to clean the rainwater that falls on or near the site.

Visit the artist's website.

Learn more about the Brightwater Treatment System.

Collection: Brightwater Influent Pump Station Bothell, WA

Artwork by Christian Moeller and Buster Simpson highlight the importance of the Influent Pump Station as the "heart" of the Brightwater Treatment System.