Leo Saul Berk, Bridge Manual, 2011
© Leo Berk, Newaukum Bridge, 2014, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Leo Berk

Over the course of three years, artist Leo Saul Berk worked to develop a deep understanding of the function and design opportunities of King County’s short and mid-span bridges (bridges that span 20 to 110 feet in length). He combined time in the field, exploring a variety of bridges and their contexts, with work at his Bridge Unit office cubicle and in his artist studio. The result: a well-conceived and ready-to-use manual of design elements that will mark and provide a visual presence for small-scale bridges County-wide.

Berk’s design elements include an enhanced railing to raise awareness of crossing a body of water and artist-designed entry pylons to punctuate the beginning and end of the bridge rail. Sign blades, cut and assembled to create one of three profiles, reference historic bridge structures. And a series of sectioned photographs adhered to the blades bring the watery environments below into view at road level.

The Bridge Manual offers King County’s system of small-scale bridges a conceptual and aesthetic ambition grounded in understanding of its technical and functional requirements. As the County builds new bridges with Leo’s manual in-hand, the intersections of roadway and waterway and King County’s stewardship of both will become more apparent.

Leo developed meaningful relationships with Bridge Unit personnel including engineers, archaeologists, ecologists, and maintenance and sign shop workers. Read about some of their encounters in Leo's series of 4Culture blog posts.

Visit the artist's website.

Listen to Bridge Unit Project manager Jamie O'Day talk about Leo Berk’s residency and design work.

Listen to Leo Berk talk about time & materials.

Leo Saul Berk, Bridge Manual, 2011
© Leo Berk, Newaukum Bridge, 2014, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Leo Berk

Over the course of three years, artist Leo Saul Berk worked to develop a deep understanding of the function and design opportunities of King County’s short and mid-span bridges (bridges that span 20 to 110 feet in length). He combined time in the field, exploring a variety of bridges and their contexts, with work at his Bridge Unit office cubicle and in his artist studio. The result: a well-conceived and ready-to-use manual of design elements that will mark and provide a visual presence for small-scale bridges County-wide.

Berk’s design elements include an enhanced railing to raise awareness of crossing a body of water and artist-designed entry pylons to punctuate the beginning and end of the bridge rail. Sign blades, cut and assembled to create one of three profiles, reference historic bridge structures. And a series of sectioned photographs adhered to the blades bring the watery environments below into view at road level.

The Bridge Manual offers King County’s system of small-scale bridges a conceptual and aesthetic ambition grounded in understanding of its technical and functional requirements. As the County builds new bridges with Leo’s manual in-hand, the intersections of roadway and waterway and King County’s stewardship of both will become more apparent.

Leo developed meaningful relationships with Bridge Unit personnel including engineers, archaeologists, ecologists, and maintenance and sign shop workers. Read about some of their encounters in Leo's series of 4Culture blog posts.

Visit the artist's website.

Listen to Bridge Unit Project manager Jamie O'Day talk about Leo Berk’s residency and design work.

Listen to Leo Berk talk about time & materials.

Leo Saul Berk, Bridge Manual, 2011
© Leo Berk, Newaukum Bridge, 2014, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Leo Berk

Over the course of three years, artist Leo Saul Berk worked to develop a deep understanding of the function and design opportunities of King County’s short and mid-span bridges (bridges that span 20 to 110 feet in length). He combined time in the field, exploring a variety of bridges and their contexts, with work at his Bridge Unit office cubicle and in his artist studio. The result: a well-conceived and ready-to-use manual of design elements that will mark and provide a visual presence for small-scale bridges County-wide.

Berk’s design elements include an enhanced railing to raise awareness of crossing a body of water and artist-designed entry pylons to punctuate the beginning and end of the bridge rail. Sign blades, cut and assembled to create one of three profiles, reference historic bridge structures. And a series of sectioned photographs adhered to the blades bring the watery environments below into view at road level.

The Bridge Manual offers King County’s system of small-scale bridges a conceptual and aesthetic ambition grounded in understanding of its technical and functional requirements. As the County builds new bridges with Leo’s manual in-hand, the intersections of roadway and waterway and King County’s stewardship of both will become more apparent.

Leo developed meaningful relationships with Bridge Unit personnel including engineers, archaeologists, ecologists, and maintenance and sign shop workers. Read about some of their encounters in Leo's series of 4Culture blog posts.

Visit the artist's website.

Listen to Bridge Unit Project manager Jamie O'Day talk about Leo Berk’s residency and design work.

Listen to Leo Berk talk about time & materials.

Leo Saul Berk, Bridge Manual, 2011
© Leo Berk, Patterson Bridge, 2014, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Margo Christianson

Over the course of three years, artist Leo Saul Berk worked to develop a deep understanding of the function and design opportunities of King County’s short and mid-span bridges (bridges that span 20 to 110 feet in length). He combined time in the field, exploring a variety of bridges and their contexts, with work at his Bridge Unit office cubicle and in his artist studio. The result: a well-conceived and ready-to-use manual of design elements that will mark and provide a visual presence for small-scale bridges County-wide.

Berk’s design elements include an enhanced railing to raise awareness of crossing a body of water and artist-designed entry pylons to punctuate the beginning and end of the bridge rail. Sign blades, cut and assembled to create one of three profiles, reference historic bridge structures. And a series of sectioned photographs adhered to the blades bring the watery environments below into view at road level.

The Bridge Manual offers King County’s system of small-scale bridges a conceptual and aesthetic ambition grounded in understanding of its technical and functional requirements. As the County builds new bridges with Leo’s manual in-hand, the intersections of roadway and waterway and King County’s stewardship of both will become more apparent.

Leo developed meaningful relationships with Bridge Unit personnel including engineers, archaeologists, ecologists, and maintenance and sign shop workers. Read about some of their encounters in Leo's series of 4Culture blog posts.

Visit the artist's website.

Listen to Bridge Unit Project manager Jamie O'Day talk about Leo Berk’s residency and design work.

Listen to Leo Berk talk about time & materials.

Leo Saul Berk, Bridge Manual, 2011
© Leo Berk, Patterson Bridge, 2014, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Margo Christianson

Over the course of three years, artist Leo Saul Berk worked to develop a deep understanding of the function and design opportunities of King County’s short and mid-span bridges (bridges that span 20 to 110 feet in length). He combined time in the field, exploring a variety of bridges and their contexts, with work at his Bridge Unit office cubicle and in his artist studio. The result: a well-conceived and ready-to-use manual of design elements that will mark and provide a visual presence for small-scale bridges County-wide.

Berk’s design elements include an enhanced railing to raise awareness of crossing a body of water and artist-designed entry pylons to punctuate the beginning and end of the bridge rail. Sign blades, cut and assembled to create one of three profiles, reference historic bridge structures. And a series of sectioned photographs adhered to the blades bring the watery environments below into view at road level.

The Bridge Manual offers King County’s system of small-scale bridges a conceptual and aesthetic ambition grounded in understanding of its technical and functional requirements. As the County builds new bridges with Leo’s manual in-hand, the intersections of roadway and waterway and King County’s stewardship of both will become more apparent.

Leo developed meaningful relationships with Bridge Unit personnel including engineers, archaeologists, ecologists, and maintenance and sign shop workers. Read about some of their encounters in Leo's series of 4Culture blog posts.

Visit the artist's website.

Listen to Bridge Unit Project manager Jamie O'Day talk about Leo Berk’s residency and design work.

Listen to Leo Berk talk about time & materials.

Leo Saul Berk, Bridge Manual, 2011
© Leo Berk, Patterson Bridge, 2014, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Margo Christianson

Over the course of three years, artist Leo Saul Berk worked to develop a deep understanding of the function and design opportunities of King County’s short and mid-span bridges (bridges that span 20 to 110 feet in length). He combined time in the field, exploring a variety of bridges and their contexts, with work at his Bridge Unit office cubicle and in his artist studio. The result: a well-conceived and ready-to-use manual of design elements that will mark and provide a visual presence for small-scale bridges County-wide.

Berk’s design elements include an enhanced railing to raise awareness of crossing a body of water and artist-designed entry pylons to punctuate the beginning and end of the bridge rail. Sign blades, cut and assembled to create one of three profiles, reference historic bridge structures. And a series of sectioned photographs adhered to the blades bring the watery environments below into view at road level.

The Bridge Manual offers King County’s system of small-scale bridges a conceptual and aesthetic ambition grounded in understanding of its technical and functional requirements. As the County builds new bridges with Leo’s manual in-hand, the intersections of roadway and waterway and King County’s stewardship of both will become more apparent.

Leo developed meaningful relationships with Bridge Unit personnel including engineers, archaeologists, ecologists, and maintenance and sign shop workers. Read about some of their encounters in Leo's series of 4Culture blog posts.

Visit the artist's website.

Listen to Bridge Unit Project manager Jamie O'Day talk about Leo Berk’s residency and design work.

Listen to Leo Berk talk about time & materials.

Collection: Bridge Manual

Artist Leo Saul Berk designed a Bridge Manual with artwork elements to be used on short and mid-span bridges in King County.